What Does Helpful vs. Harmful Therapy Look Like?

 

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What Does Helpful vs. Harmful Therapy Look Like?

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6 responses to this post.

  1. […] Helpful vs. Harmful Therapies: What Do They Look Like? […]

  2. Thanks for mentioning RPM! My son Philip is an RPMer and a blogger. I’m so happy we no longer do ABA. My son tells us how much he felt like a pet to be trained and was so frustrated. I’d like to share part of one of his posts:

    “Communication is vitally important to all people. Before I could communicate I was trapped in my autistic sounding board. I could not reach out with my thoughts. I only had myself to talk to. I was made to perform like a trained animal. I was treated as such. I stopped respecting myself, stopped opening up to others. I was without hope someone would know me. I retreated into my own world. To stim gave me pleasure not available to me otherwise.

    When I was nine, my parents took me to see Soma. I was surprised she talked to me regularly. She challenged me to picture my life differently. She was the tower of strength I needed. I put my life on the line. I would understand the stakes of communicating so I could be known by my loving family and others. Learning to express myself was peace to my soul. I poured my energy to Soma to please her because I liked her so much for believing in me.

    Today I am blogging about the power of my communication. I am no longer sad about being autistic. I am happy being able to express my opinions and views as an autistic. I am spreading hope to other autistics that they can live meaningful lives. I am always learning and improving my skills. I have hopes for becoming a writer and advocate for autistics. Now I can tell my story.”

    His blog (with occasional writings by his mom) is http://www.faithhopeloveautism.blogspot.com

    Thanks for all you do to help bring better understanding and acceptance!

  3. […] – “People worry a lot about their “violent” Autistic children as they get bigger and stronger and harder to control. But far too often, the “violence” is stirred up by years of very frustrating therapy…. There’s only so long that a person can take being pushed into sobbing meltdowns of frustration before they are willing to do whatever it takes to get the torment to stop. It is not only heart-breakingly cruel to treat a child this way, it is grossly irresponsible. Therapy like this creates problems. The best it will produce is a child trained to do things that make no sense in order to avoid distress and get rewards. The worst it will produce is a child that bites, kicks, hits . . . and gets bigger and stronger along with becoming less and less controllable. This therapy is not designed to raise a child who feels safe and comfortable with who they are, who feels safe to express their individuality, who is mentored in growing and developing into the best person they can be, expressing their true nature in ways others can come to connect with. ” – https://unstrangemind.wordpress.com/2014/11/07/what-does-helpful-vs-harmful-therapy-look-like/ […]

  4. I am the mom of an autistic 3.5 year old boy who was diagnosed at 21 months. I have seen the video of the little girl and I was really heartbroken for her. It was posted on an “autism support” facebook page and I wrote that it looked abusive to me and I got bombarded with negative comments from other parents. My son gets ABA and it looks nothing like that video, but I suspect, from another blog that you have written, that it is not “true” ABA. If I could ever share some videos and get your feedback I would really appreciate it :)

    • Jill, I agree with you about the video of the little girl! I might be slow to respond because I can’t afford internet at home so I would have to download/view it from a public hotspot, but I would look at videos and talk about it with you if you wanted. It’s something you would want to keep private, for your son’s protection and dignity, so I will email you to talk more about this.

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